Vancouver Park Board Whale Ban Voted Unanimously

Category: Science Written by Sean Lennox 106 0

The Vancouver Parks Commission has decided to ban cetacean captivity at the Vancouver Aquarium.

The Commission voted unanimously Thursday night to amend its rules on captivity of cetaceans after a long debate that lasted two evenings .

More than 60 people spoke at special meetings, including representatives from the Vancouver Aquarium, scientists and environmental activists.

The Commission considered four options during the discussions, including the expansion of the dolphin, whale and porpoise captivity program, and the prohibition of this practice.

The Vancouver Parks Commission has decided to ban cetacean captivity at the Vancouver Aquarium.

The Commission voted unanimously Thursday night to amend its rules on captivity of cetaceans after a long debate that lasted two evenings .

More than 60 people spoke at special meetings, including representatives from the Vancouver Aquarium, scientists and environmental activists.

The Commission considered four options during the discussions, including the expansion of the dolphin, whale and porpoise captivity program, and the prohibition of this practice.

Several commissioners have indicated that the recent deaths of the only two belugas in the Aquarium last November had influenced their votes.

Aurora and her daughter Qila died in two weeks of a mysterious illness.

A new chapter

Commission Commissioner Sarah Kirby-Yung stressed that whale death was a “tipping point”.

“The time has come for a change,” she said.

Members of the Aquarium staff, including President John Nightingale, were present at the meeting on Thursday evening. They quickly departed after the vote and refused to talk with reporters.

The members of the Parks Commission must present the details of a new regulation in May.

Opposite reactions

The PETA welcomed the new policy adopted by the Vancouver Parks Commission.

“In light of the overwhelming number of deaths at the Vancouver Aquarium – 10 captive-born cetaceans, all 10 of them died – the ban is welcome,” PETA CEO Tracy Reiman said in a news release Press. She wants the Vancouver Aquarium to pick up the five belugas from SeaWorld and the Georgia Aquarium and be released.

John Nightingale, president and CEO of the Vancouver Aquarium, said he was very disappointed. “This decision to ban the captivity of cetaceans will have a profound impact on the research we are doing. It will also have a devastating effect on our whale rescue operations, “he said.

Indeed, the rescue operations of marine mammals will no longer take place, because no longer having cetaceans permanently at the Aquarium, there will be no more qualified personnel on the spot.

In addition, if the Department of Fisheries and Oceans determines that a rescued animal can not be released, the Vancouver Aquarium will not be able to accommodate it.

According to the establishment, the rescue operations of marine mammals will no longer take place, as there will be no more qualified personnel at the Aquarium because they no longer have any cetaceans at the Aquarium.

In addition, if the Department of Fisheries and Oceans determines that a rescued animal can not be released, the Vancouver Aquarium will not be able to accommodate it.

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